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Using Marketing to Improve Employee Recruitment Efforts

The New York Times recently reported that more and more human resources departments are employing marketing techniques to attract better qualified candidates. What does it mean for business or communications students hoping to land a gig in HR?

Marketing Has a Home in HR
The thinking behind the new strategy is that employees will be more likely to accept a position if a prospective employer gives them a compelling reason to do so, reported the Times. Apparently, enough Americans have not acquired the skills needed for the new, service-oriented economy. What is more, baby boomers are beginning to retire, which is opening up a greater number of positions.

If you've been watching commercial television, you may have noticed company advertisements that present their workplaces as highly desirable. Verizon, for example, has recently featured a commercial where one of its employees says what a terrific place Verizon is to work. Similarly, Wal-Mart has for some time broadcast commercials boasting what the company perceives as benefits of working at Wal-Mart.

What Does this Mean for Future Human Resources Professionals?
It may mean that HR hopefuls must become savvier in the principles of marketing. If you're interested in pursuing a career in human resources, consider taking a couple of classes in marketing and communications. Talk with career counselors and solicit their advice about the value of marketing to a human resources career. Pick the brains of human resources professionals and see what they say about it.

It may still be worthwhile to cultivate marketing skills, even in tighter labor markets. Getting top talent is always a challenge, so investing in efforts to build your company's reputation will likely always pay off in some measure.

HR professionals have always been a jack-of-all-trades, serving as an expert in benefits, wages, health and safety, and organizational culture and development. Now they may also have to tackle a new subject, expanding their areas of expertise even further.

The New York Times